24-Hour Hotline: 210-349-7273

Statistics

The following sections provide national statistics on sexual assault.
For Texas facts, see the report at the end of each section.

Prevalence of Assault

  • Every 98 seconds, another American is sexual assaulted.1
  • 1 out of every 6 American women has been the victim of an attempted or completed rape in her lifetime.1
  • 1 out of every 33 American men has been the victim of an attempted or completed rape in his lifetime.1
  • A majority of child victims are ages 12-17.1

Where Assaults Typically Occur 

  • 55% at or near the victim’s home2
  • 15% in an open public space2
  • 12% at or near a relative’s home2
  • 10% in an enclosed but public parking area, such as a garage or parking lot2
  • 8% on school property2

Common Activities Before an Assault

  • 48% sleeping or performing another activity at home2
  • 29% traveling to and from work or school or to shop or run errands2
  • 12% at work2
  • 7% at school2
  • 5% doing an unknown or other activity2

Age of Victims 

  • 15% ages 12-173
  • 54% ages 18-343
  • 28% ages 35-643
  • 3% ages 65+3

The Survivor 
The likelihood of suicidal or depressive thoughts increases after sexual violence.

  • 94% of female survivors experience symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) during the two weeks following the rape.4
  • 33% of women who are raped contemplate suicide.5
  • 13% of women who are raped attempt suicide.5
  • Approximately 70% of rape or sexual assault survivors experience moderate to severe distress, a larger percentage than for any other violent crime.6
  • People who have been sexually assaulted are more likely to use drugs than the general public.5

Their Relationships
Sexual violence also impacts a survivor’s relationships with family, friends and co-workers.5

  • 38% of survivors experience work or school problems, which can include significant problems with a boss, coworker, or peer.
  • 37% experience family/friend problems, including getting into arguments more frequently than before, not feeling able to trust their family/friends, or not feeling as close to them as before the crime.
  • 84% of survivors who were victimized by an intimate partner experience professional or emotional issues, including moderate to severe distress, or increased problems at work or school.
  • 79% of survivors who were victimized by a family member, close friend or acquaintance experience professional or emotional issues, including moderate to severe distress, or increased problems at work or school.
  • 67% of survivors who were victimized by a stranger experience professional or emotional issues, including moderate to severe distress, or increased problems at work or school.

Prosecution and Reporting

  • Perpetrators of sexual violence are less likely to go to jail or prison than other criminals.
  • Out of every 1000 rapes, 994 perpetrators will walk free.
  • The majority of sexual assaults are never reported.
  • Only 310 out of every 1000 sexual assaults are reported to police. That translates to about 2 out of 3 sexual assaults left unreported.8

Reasons for Reporting
Of the sexual violence crimes reported to police from 2005-2010, the survivor gave the following reasons for doing so2:

  • 28% to protect the household or survivor from further crimes by the offender
  • 25% to stop the incident or prevent recurrence or escalation
    21% to improve police surveillance or they believed they had a duty to do so
  • 17% to catch/punish/prevent offender from reoffending
  • 6% gave a different answer, or declined to cite one reason
  • 3% did so to get help or recover loss

Reasons for Not Reporting
Of the sexual violence crimes not reported to police from 2005-2010, the survivor gave the following reasons for not doing so2:

  • 20% feared retaliation
  • 13% believed the police wouldn’t do anything to help
  • 13% believed it was a personal matter
  • 8% reported to a different official
  • 8% believed it wasn’t important enough to report
  • 7% didn’t want to get the perpetrator in trouble
  • 2% believed the police couldn’t do anything to help
  • 30% gave another reason, or did not cite a reason

Relation to Survivor 
70% of rapes are committed by someone known to the survivor.1

  • 45% acquaintance
  • 28% stranger
  • 25% current or former spouse (boyfriend or girlfriend)
  • 6% more than one person or the survivor cannot remember
  • 1% non-spousal relative

Age
Half of perpetrators are age 30 or older2.

  • 25% ages 21-29
  • 9% ages 18-20
  • 15% age 17 or younger

Race/Ethnicity 
The majority of perpetrators are white2.

  • 27% black
  • 8% unknown ethnicity
  • 6% other
  • 1% mixed group

Criminal History
Perpetrators are often serial offenders7.

  • 370 have at least one prior felony conviction.
  • 520 will be released while awaiting trial.
  • 70 of the released perpetrators will re-offend on another crime before their case is decided.

All statistics were taken from data provided by The Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network (RAINN) at https://www.rainn.org/statistics/.

  1. U.S Department of Justice: Bureau of Justice Statistics. 2007 National Crime Victimization Study, 2010-2014 (2015).
  2. Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. Bureau of Justice Statistics. Female Victims of Sexual Violence, 1994-2010 (2013).
  3. i. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Bureau of Justice Statistics, Sex Offenses and Offenders (1997); ii. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Bureau of Justice Statistics, Crimes Against the Elderly, 2003-2013 (2014).
  4. D.S. Riggs, T. Murdock, W. Walsh, A prospective examination of post-traumatic stress disorder in rape victims. Journal of Traumatic Stress 455-475 (1992).
  5. DG Kilpatrick, CN Edumuds, AK Seymour. Rape in America: A Report to the Nation. Arlington, VA: National Victim Center and Medical University of South Carolina (1992).
  6. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Bureau of Justice Statistics, Socio-emotional Impact of Violent Crime (2014).
  7. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Bureau of Justice Statistics, Felony Defendants in Large Urban Counties, 2009 (2013).
  8. i. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Bureau of Justice Statistics, National Crime Victimization Survey, 2010-2014 (2015); ii. Federal Bureau of Investigation, National Incident-Based Reporting System, 2012-2014 (2015); iii. Federal Bureau of Investigation, National Incident-Based Reporting System, 2012-2014 (2015); iv. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Bureau of Justice Statistics, Felony Defendants in Large Urban Counties, 2009 (2013).

Texas Facts

Health and Well-being: The Texas Statewide Prevalence Study on Sexual Assault is a statewide telephone survey conducted in English and Spanish. The study used a randomly selected, representative sample of 1,203 adult Texans.

The purpose of this report is to present the descriptive findings on sexual assault prevalence, health and well-being in Texas, including the victims’ relationship to perpetrators, involvement of alcohol, reporting of sexual assault to the police and the impact of sexual assault on victims.